AMITRON HERBICIDE IN SUGARCANE

AMITRON NOW REGISTERED IN CANE IN AUSTRALIA


700 g ai/kg Amicarbazone   [GROUP C HERBICIDE]

AmiTron® is a UV stable broad-spectrum herbicide for sugarcane with both pre-emergent and post-emergent activity against grass, broadleaf weeds and some sedges. 

It is especially effective against vine weeds e.g. Ipomoea species.

Because AmiTron doesn't break down in sunlight, is activated on minimal rainfall, and has the ability to pass through cane trash mulch layers, it is an excellent tool for all cane districts.

Terminates weeds with extreme prejudice.


WHY IS AMITRON THE GO-TO HERBICIDE IN SUGARCANE?

  • UV Stable

  • Moves through trash

  • Easily activated

  • Residual control

  • Wide weed spectrum

  • Post-emergence activity

  • Versatile

  • Compatible

SUGGESTED USE PATTERNS FOR AMITRON IN SUGARCANE

Broadcast or banded sprays in early plant cane


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Banded sprays (on row mound) in furrow irrigated cane (e.g. Burdekin)


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Broadcast or banded sprays in ratoons immediately after harvest


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Directed sprays in plant cane (up to canopy closure)


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Directed sprays in ratoons (up to canopy closure)


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Late sprays in ratoons or plant cane (after canopy closure) for vine control


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WEEDS CONTROLLED BY AMITRON IN SUGARCANE

VINE WEEDS

Calopo (Calopogonium mucunoides)
Centro (Centrosema pubescens)
Bellvine (Ipomea plebeia)
Pink convolvulus (Ipomoea triloba)
Morning glory (Ipomea purpurea)
Red convolvulus (Ipomoea hederifolia)


GRASS WEEDS

Awnless barnyard grass (Echinochloa colonum)
Guinea grass (Panicum maximum)
Crowsfoot grass (Eleusine indica)
Green summer grass (Brachiaria subquadripara)
Summer grass (Digitaria ciliaris)


BROADLEAF WEEDS

Bluetop/Billygoat weed (Ageratum spp.)
Cudweed (Gnaphalium sp.)
Common pigweed (Portulaca oleracea)
Paddy’s lucerne (Sida rhombifolia)
Green amaranth (Amaranthus viridis)
Pink burr (Urena lobata)
Rattle pod (Crotalaria spp.)
Thickhead (Crassocephalum crepidioides)
Common sensitive plant (Mimosa pudica)
Fat hen (Chenopodium album)
Bittercress (Coronopus didymus)
Joint vetch (Aeschynomene indica)
Phyllanthus (Phyllanthus sp.)
Common sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus)
Potato weed (Galinsoga parviflora)
Sesbania pea (Sesbania cannabina)
Milkweed (Euphorbia heterophylla)
White eclipta (Eclipta prostrata)
Wild rose (Cleome aculeata)


SEDGES

Annual sedges, including some Cyperus spp. but not nutgrass (Cyperus rotundus)


AMITRON RATE SELECTION

500 g/ha RATE – SHORT term (up to 4-6 weeks)

800 g/ha rate – MEDIUM term (6-8 weeks)

1 kg/ha – LONG term (8 weeks or longer)

APPLICATION:

  • broadcast early
  • directed early
  • directed late (prior to canopy closure
  • Directed very late (after canopy closure

Always refer to the label for registered rates and complete details

REDUCING RISK OF ADVERSE CROP EFFECTS

1. SELECT APPROPRIATE RATES FOR SOIL TYPES

  • Use lower rates to reduce risk on lighter soils

  • DO NOT use on very sandy soils (>90%)

  • Select rates of tank mix partners appropriate to soil type

2. CHECK PLANTING DRILL SHAPE AND SOIL COVER FOR PLANT CANE (early stages)

  • Make sure soil cover over sett is adequate. At least 75 mm, more on light soils.

  • Ensure a wide open-profile drill to prevent slippage of treated soil to the zone over top of sett. Open out drill with a light cultivation if drill shape is too steep in loose soil types.

  • In double disc opener planting systems, ensure soil cover over plant slit.

3. REDUCE SPRAY CONTACT ON LEAF IN PLANT & RATOON CANE (advanced stages)

  • Use directed sprays when cane is advanced. 
    Beware of possible crop leaf interference on spray patterns and use low throw nozzles, leaf lifters, directed nozzle configurations e.g. Irvin legs etc. as appropriate to achieve good coverage of both weeds and soil.

  • Nozzles need to give good coverage yet not cause drift. 
    Droplets should not be finer than medium category.

4. CHECK SHOOT HEIGHT IN EARLY APPLICATION TIMING IN RATOONS (immediately after harvest)

  • Preferably apply before or just after shoot emergence with this use pattern.
    Add paraquat if shoots are advanced beyond about 4-5 leaf stage to reduce leaf uptake.

  • Consider use of banded sprays directed only over the top of row mounds in furrow irrigated situations so that excessive water flux in the inter-row is not a risk of movement of the active to the crop root zone.

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

MANAGING LOSS OF AMITRON IN RUNOFF

  • Adopt weed control strategies so that risk of extreme rainfall events soon after application of herbicides is minimised
  • Do not spray if soil is saturated
  • Do not spray if heavy rainfall or irrigation is expected or planned within 48 hrs
  • Do not irrigate for at least 2 days after application if possible
  • Incorporate soil management processes so that compaction is prevented
    (e.g. controlled traffic)
  • In furrow (flood) irrigation systems, consider very early timings of banded applications centred over rows  
  • In irrigated systems, optimise watering so that runoff from paddocks is negligible
  • Where possible, retain all irrigation tailwater on-farm
  • If volume of the first irrigation after application can be manipulated, a light irrigation is preferable to a heavy irrigation
  • Do not spray AmiTron on steep lands without major adaptations to reduce rates of surface runoff  

MANAGING LOSS OF AMITRON THROUGH LEACHING

Some movement of the product through soil with water is necessary to get the herbicide into the layer of soil where weed seeds germinate.

Managing this movement to prevent excess leaching out of the root zone involves understanding soil type (particularly texture), and then adjusting timing and rates of application so risk of excessive water flows soon after application is minimised.

  • Avoid applications on very light soils
  • Do not spray if soil is saturated
  • Avoid risk of heavy precipitation or irrigation soon after application
  • Use the lowest feasible rate (for purpose)
  • In furrow (flood) irrigation systems, consider banded applications so that the flooded inter-row is not treated with AmiTron

MANAGING LOSS OF HEADLANDS, DRAINS & BUFFERS

Managing water flows after runoff exits field is also important in reducing the contamination of natural waterways. 

Slowing water flows allows for processes such as degradation, reabsorption into soil and uptake into covering vegetation to significantly reduce the contaminant moving from fields into natural systems. 

The following can help slow and reduce runoff:

  • Slope adjustments and other erosion control practices
  • Vegetation near the site of application
  • Conservation tillage systems that leave vegetation or crop residue
  • Buffer zones and vegetative filter strips with dense cover

MANAGING OFF-SITE MOVEMENT OF SPRAY DRIFT

The AmiTron label has legally binding restraints regarding spray drift. There are also restraints on the label for slope and certain no-spray windows.

Always check a current label for restraints and recommendations.


AMITRON & HERBICIDAL EFFECTS ON MARINE REEF ORGANISMS

Herbicides can potentially affect plant life in many environments, making it important to minimise off-target movement.

Recent studies by the Australian Institute of Marine Science show that AmiTron is up to 10 times less of a risk to seagrasses and corals than other PSII class herbicides such as diuron and hexazinone.

However the objective should still be to reduce risk of any contamination off-target by using sensible practices.

The sugar industry Best Management Practice Guidelines should be reviewed for current advice prior to using AmiTron in any crop.


For more detail download the 'AmiTron Environmental Considerations' pdf.


AmiTron Environmental Considerations – sugarcane (pdf)

LAWRENCE DI BELLA ON AMITRON HERBICIDE